Tag Archives: urban sanctuary

52WoLP, week 8: the view from the north waterfront trail

The north trail road, on the other side of the Colman Pool where the old sea wall is still visible and holding back the sea, offers some interesting tidbits to consider.

On the upside, the trunks of the trees that line the road are curious. A friend of mine, Erica M., recently sent me a shot of The Octopus tree that speaks all kinds of stories, holding on, reaching up, its roots deep in the steep incline.

Another tree trunk I love on that road, pure kitsch, pure shared impulse, is the Alter. The contents change all the time, from pretty rocks to dolls and toys that wash ashore, to mementos of loved ones. Once I found a note on the beach that I only read part of; it seemed so private, such a personal wish for happier times. I folded it back up and tucked it into the Alter. I hope those wishes came true.

On the downside..after the photos….

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The downside…this road is getting more truck traffic than ever before it seems, and as a result, the path road is getting wider and wider, encroaching on the hillside. Trucks are fine, in their way…they’re necessary of course. But the trucks themselves are getting bigger, wider, etc. I know Parks has smaller trucks. I’ve seen them. Is there some way we can restrict in park road/path maintenance to the smaller trucks? That’d be nice.

Aloha!

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52WoLP, week 7: A most beautiful thing

This week in 52 Weeks of Lincoln Park, we meet Sky Darwin, a local artist you might see if you’re very lucky along the shores of the Salish Sea in Lincoln Park. He does beautiful things with driftwood. Beautiful. His sculptural works made me think of mandalas, because surely the delicately balanced pieces he was fine tuning would be washed away with the next high tide. And that, of course, only added to the pleasure of his creations. Take a gander:

Sky studied at Cornish and has been working on these all-too-brief sculptural installations since Sept. 2012. He has a background in dance, music and design–all in evidence here. He took videos of the finished product but as yet they’re not up on vimeo or youtube. On the other hand, they are up on his facebook page so maybe look him up–the vids are great because you can hear kids marveling at the pieces moving gently in the sunset breeze.

These pieces were beautiful. And as predicted, I cruised by the spot where they were a day or so later, and they were gone. Beauty is fleeting.

Thanks Sky!

Addendum 3/4/13: Sky now has an official Facebook page–https//:www.facebook.m/ShiftwoodSculpture check it out, he put more pictures and videos there, and will keep it fresh with new stuff for our pure, unadulterated enjoyment. Live aloha!

52 Weeks of Lincoln Park: LP Watch

The thing is, there’s always something going on. Obviously there are the seasonal and weather related things, there’s the tides and shifting cliffs and such. But there’s also this other stuff–science projects, maintenance projects, projects out of the blue, who-knows-what-this-is projects. You go to the park several times a week and you’ll see what I mean: it’s rarely the same.

So #5 of 52WoLP curiosities: a fog collection project, somewhat ill-considered radical-pruning, and a pair of antique water skis, circa 1965.

First up: passive fog collection project by a UW student, studying anew a technique of harvesting water that’s been around for a very long time. It’s pretty cool in that its ridiculously simple, and it will be down by the Colman Pool until April. Happy collecting!

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Second up: ugly I mean, ill considered pruning, south end of park and near the first parking lot:

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And finally: someone neatly placed a pair of very old water skis at the south end parking lot for our viewing pleasure. Most years, towards the end of summer, it’s warm enough for some impressive water skiing and wake riding to take place in the cove. I suspect that at some point these very skis saw a few good runs in their day, and have been returned for their final ride home.

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52 weeks of Lincoln Park: the art of nature

Week #4 finds us careening towards February, which means Valentine’s day which means love. Denise Dahn, another West Seattle artist and Lover of Lincoln Park, sent me a couple of photos of a few of her favorite things in Lincoln Park: The Dancing Otter and The Cedar & Doug entwined trees.

The otter is down along the water, north of the pool, and Cedar & Doug can be found on the trail that heads east from the fence trail, between the main Colman Pool trail down, and the Beach Trail a little further South. Well, might’s well just take all the trails, you’ll love it.

Cedar & Doug have grown together and are completely entwined at this point, roots, trunk and all.  They make a stunningly beautiful couple.

I added of my faves, too–what Denise calls the Pock Marked tree ( a tree which has become a virtual cafeteria for flickers and woodpeckers, and they are so systematic, it’s awesome) and finally, a semi permanent text based outdoor installation of found objects 😉
If you have any faves, let me know or share them here. Coming up soon: the birds of spring.

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52 Weeks of Lincoln Park: Driftwood

A few years back I did a year-long, nearly daily project called My Life w/Car, or MLwC, wherein I tracked my transportation to see if maybe I could change some unconscious habits.  Basically I wanted to get rid of my car.  I ended up not doing that, but for sure changed everything around my transportation habits.  It was a very good project.

I’m starting a new blog project today called 52 Weeks of Lincoln Park, or 52WoLP.  The goals are not as ambitious, I suppose…well, there are no goals, so there. What I want to do is simply pay homage to a gorgeous gem of a park, Lincoln Park, here in West Seattle.

LP is spectacular in so many ways. It is both urban forest and recreation area: a stand of sequoia watches over a baseball field, with native undergrowth all around, and a real sense of “getting away” from things for a while, even as you hear the crack of a bat and cheers from spectators.

It is refuge for nesting bald eagles, owls, warblers, and baby seals, as well as  families with their kids splashing in the wading pool or playing on the swings.

It has a zip line that I swear is going at all times of the day and night–it’s short, it’s free, and it’s very very popular.  It’s exceptionally low tech, especially the old tire at the end of the line.

In the summer it has Shakespearean theatre as the sun sets fabulously golden and lovely over Vashon Island.  It has seen its own share of theatre recently as friends of Lincoln Park stood together against what would have been a massive, very invasive change to its nature.

So each week this year, I’m going to simply witness a wonderful thing about Lincoln Park, to pay my respects and share this gem we have here in Seattle. First up, because the sunset walks along the water the past few days have been spectacular: Driftwood.