Tag Archives: progressive

Real Americans vs. what… Un-Real Americans?

I personally love how politics is so happily intertwined with Scobleizer’s blog. It’s a risky thing to do because people will criticize your POV and that could impact your credibility in other, non-politicized subjects you undertake.

But another part of of me, the one that loves the political geekery of Scobleizer, wonders if the open minded perspective that runs through his brand of politics doesn’t also form the basis of his views on web apps, the open source movement, social networking, vast info sharing, and all the rest. I think it does.

So recently, I enjoyed his post where he borrows Dave Winer’s post on I am not an American. Dave lists all the ways that he is not an American, according to the extremely narrow-minded right wing definition of who is an American.

And in no small part did I enjoy this post because it joins in a growing chorus of the bigger US who do no fit in the narrow mold offered up by so-called real Americans–we are all growing so tired of this nonsense, at once dangerous and silly as only divisive rhetoric can be.

So let me add to the list:

I am educated, have advanced degrees, and am bi-lingual. I also like really good cappuccinos. I guess I am not an American.

I enjoy an open mind, even though sometimes it’s challenging, and really do want to learn new things from people who don’t think exactly like I do. I like diversity, I really do. Apparently I am not an American.

I am part of a network of people who think small changes to one’s carbon footprint really does make a difference, if only because we have to start somewhere and becoming conscious is a great place to start. I am not an American.

I am a lesbian, and have lived through calamitous times to fight for my rights. I have been subject to judgment and discrimination but still I know most people do not wish me harm. My friends, neighbors and family support my non-sanctioned relationship; after nearly 20 years together, I look forward to a legal marriage, even if it means going to another state to do it. I am totally not an American.

My government has helped me go to school and university, has set aside some of the most gorgeous areas on the planet for my own enjoyment, and has created and maintained highways and byways that I can travel–land, water and air–to go anywhere I want, has laid the foundation for a sense of safety and help in disasters, and has helped my city and state to make hundreds of changes that lead to a better environment. Proof, I am not an American.

I do not belong to an organized religion and admit that I wonder if organized religion will be the ruin of us all, but I do have a spiritual practice that involves buddhist meditation. There you have it, I am not an American.

I believe our government has saved our collective ass at key points in history and does best with more, not less, participation from each of us. I believe a democratic government can and should help us all be better global citizens. I am not an American.

I believe our public schools have been the envy of the world in the past, but are not now, and that the whole system is being undermined by the same fear-based forces that refuse to see themselves as part of a greater whole, part of a global community. I am not an American.

I believe we have an opportunity…no, a duty to lead the world in thinking about global climate change first, with greater technology and creativity, and the willingness to participate in change at a local, individual, state, national and global level. I am not an American.

Finally, I am very very proud to be part of that large group out there that doesn’t fit into the divisive, narrow confines of what the vocal unreal-american minority calls Real America.

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Days 339-345: MLwC, a Can-Do Attitude and Hope

We democrats are lucky this time around: we’ve got two awesome candidates and I’ll be happy when either one of them wins in November–as I’m certain one of them will. Whoever gets the nod in the run-up, I just hope they have the good sense to step back and let the Repugnicans tear each other apart–I’m also pretty sure that will happen. What goes around comes around.

I’m disappointed that Edwards dropped out. I had my enviro and anti-big-corpo-madness hopes pinned on him, but I wasn’t heart sick to see him leave the race…we have such an excellent choice with Hillary and Barack. Except for one thing…that environment issue. Oh, and the big-corpo-madness issue. I don’t think either of the candidates raises my pulse on those issues and for that, I’m truly hoping for a miracle once they get in office. I’m hoping for some enlightenment, as neither one has a strong track record or seems a strong champion for issues that are big for me. Still and all, as a country, we can only do better, and we have only to put the past eight years where they belong–behind us–and move on in a better direction.

Rosie the Riveter and Hillary Clinton

I’m rooting for Hillary because I think she’s a woman with a can-do attitude. She’s an incredibly hard worker–and like so many women who have had to fight hard to get half the respect they deserve, she’s got some rough edges. I understand that, and I even appreciate that. I understand her demeanor, which at times can be brusk–it doesn’t sway my sense that she has the experience, knowledge and passion to lead us in a direction I wholeheartedly support. I would love Hillary to be a resoundingly successful first woman president of the United States.

But this morning I was thinking about something. I was thinking about how hopeful I was when Bill Clinton was first running for office back in ’92. 15 freaking years ago–I can hardly believe it. Bill Clinton was incredibly hopeful and inspiring and he came from virtually nowhere to win the nomination, and he played music I could relate to, and he was simply the voice of the same section of my generation that wanted a progressive force in the white house after so many dismal years of Bush 1 and Reagan (no, I don’t think Reagan walked on water–I’m from California and witnessed his cold-hearted elitist governing style first hand).

Bill Clinton offered hope that things could be different, and I was swept along with it. All in all I think it was a good presidency, though there are some things I still wish he’d done differently (that’s an understatement). Clinton, both Hillary and Bill, wear the scars of that time.

If Barack gets the nomination, I know he’ll win the presidency, and I’ll help. He’s not my first choice, not even my second choice–but I get the draw. I get the pull of hope, the resonance of a generation chomping at the bit to do things differently, and I hope he’s able to change things, if that’s how the nomination shakes out. More than anything, I’m looking forward to a healing, forward looking president. I remember the allure of hope–it can move mountains.

Daily Stats: Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu, Fri, Sat, Sun
Car: 88 miles (a lot of biz and 14 tasks)
Bike: 0
Ped: 5
Bus: 0