Category Archives: experience

Embodied perception: sounds complex but…

I’m reading The Glass Cage by Nicholas Carr and really: if you deal with technology (and by deal with it, I mean use it, and so I’m talking about all of us) you need to read this book.

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For some time I’ve been weaning myself from a wee case of internet addiction. What can I say, I earned my livelihood being online since 1997, so it’s not too surprising it had an effect on me. From where I stand now, the effect of that near 20 year interaction is startling. My real creativity waned (I was an artist and writer at one time), my interactions with the world became goal-oriented, and my happiness took at hit. I was vaguely aware this was happening, but mostly I was charmed and amazed by each new clever shiny thing being offered up by technology, even as I was daily driven more by what a given program or device could do than I was by experiencing the process.

And here’s a true story from way back at the dawn of time when I worked at a now ubiquitous internet company. In those days, we slaved. Day and night, the company, the idea, the technology consumed us, captivated us. After a few dog years, some of us started to leave, as I did later. What I noticed was this: almost all the people were drawn to new professions, interests, occupations that involved the body. It was uncanny. Yoga, massage, environmental work, cycling, carpentry, art, you name it–they wanted somehow to use their bodies, their senses. Striking.

Fast forward to The Glass Cage and I finally understand what was happening thanks to one of the many ideas Carr is working with: embodied perception. We perceive the world around us with so many of our senses, sense we often don’t know are happily toiling away doing what they are meant to do. Many of these senses involve the physical experience and cognition of our environment. And automation has a tendency–by making things simple, easy and quick–to impede that vast cognition.

E. J. Meade, the Colorado architect, said something revealing when I talked to him about his firm’s adoption of computer-aided design systems. The hard part wasn’t learning how to use the software. That was pretty easy. What was tough was learning how not to use it. The speed, ease, and sheer novelty of CAD made it enticing. The first instinct of the firm’s designers was to plop themselves down at their computers at the start of a project. But when they took a good hard look at their work, they realized that the software was a hindrance to creativity. It was closing off aesthetic and functional possibilities  even as it was quickening the pace of production. As Meade and his colleagues thought more critically about the effects of automation, they began to resist the technology’s temptations. They found themselves “bringing the computer in later and later in the course of  a project….For the unwary and the uncritical, it can overwhelm other, more important considerations.

The book is full of studies and stories that clarify the instinct of my co-workers when they left the machine we were building, and no doubt most if not all of them use technology in their lives in a big way, just as I do. Carr’s questions, however, are valid. Are technology and automation tools that encourage us to go deeper, live more fully, or have we imbued them with more than they deserve, a creative, intelligent function they do not have…and have we outsourced those functions because we tilt towards fast and easy, even as we sense an urge towards an embodied experience of the world?

I’m happy to say that as devices and their functions have been somewhat demoted in my daily life, the process, rhythm, taste and feel of life itself have taken precedence. I still struggle with time-and-attention devouring devices, but since they have their place, let the struggle continue. Keeps me on my toes.

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52WoLP #20: Opening Day!!!

For lots of swimmers in West Seattle and beyond, today is the first day of Swimming Season at the Colman Pool.  The Colman Pool, a saltwater outdoor pool, first opened in 1941, replacing a man-made tide filled swimming hole that  had been popular since the 20s. The Colman Pool, made possible by a very generous donation by the Colman family, has long been a favorite spot for swimmers, sunbathers and families all summer long. Here are a couple of snaps, then and now.

Enjoy!  52 Weeks of Lincoln Park is a year long observation of the many aspects of Lincoln Park, the gem of West Seattle.

52WoLP #18: Sometimes rules suck, but dogs will be dogs

Sometimes rules suck, right?  And sometimes you just want to do what you want to do, regardless of others. But we live in a big city, with more people and more dogs all the time.  Like my Dad said when I threw a candy wrapper on the ground, what if everyone did that?

It’s a very valid question.

The dog rules are there because we live in a city with a lot of other people and because this park has wild and cultivated areas–areas we pay tax money to protect.

There’s the pick-up-after-your-dog rule, and people seem pretty much okay with that one.  Then there’s the no-off-leash-dogs thing, and the majority of dog walkers seem okay with that one.  After all, it’s not an off-leash park, it’s an everyone + wildlife park.  And then there’s the no-dogs-allowed part and I gotta say, this last one gets almost no attention at all.  There really are–no really— parts in the park where dogs aren’t allowed at all: the beach and the playfields.

These rules that for some impinge on the god-given rights of dogs to be dogs really upset some people.  A lot.  I sort of understand.  You come home from work, the dog is crazy to run…what are you going to do?

Here’s the deal behind the rules: there are way more dogs and people using the park than ever before.  Way more.  We share the beach with creatures that need it for nesting and life itself.  Dogs will always be dogs on the beach and will always have a hard time resisting the urge to go after that wildlife.  (full disclosure: I like dogs. A lot.)

The other one, playfields: the ballfields are pretty carefully maintained and protected for a specific purpose: ball games.  Dogs running, chasing, digging, and doing the things dogs do (pun intended) flies in the face of the tax-money you are paying to maintain that field.  Do us all a favor and keep your dogs off the playfields.

The park really and truly is a space we all share.  Runners and walkers who frequently prove an irresistible target for even the sweetest dogs; birds and creatures who provide the feeling of getting-away-from-it-all and sing those gorgeous songs that lift our hearts–they make their nests in those bushes where some people throw balls for their dogs to chase;  baby seals and ducks and grebes who need the habitat our beautiful beaches provide.

We all share this park.  There are dozens of offleash parks in the city.  Be a citizen dog-owner, do the right thing, we will all love you for it.

52 Weeks of Lincoln Park is a year long exploration and adoration of the loveliest gem of West Seattle.  Enjoy!

52WoLP: week #9 and Animal Presence

I can’t help it. I’m still enveloped in the pleasure of swimming with green sea turtles in Hawaii for the past two weeks, and am not yet finished replaying the sensation over in my imagination.  Those great bodies moving so gracefully through blue green water, coming up for a gulp of air and a look at the odd but apparently harmless creature swimming alongside–I will not soon forget the glint in the turtle’s calm, accepting eye.

What does this have to do with Lincoln Park, you might ask. Well,  I was reminded of a post on the subject of animal presence by the eloquent Trileigh Tucker, intimate friend of Lincoln Park and all of nature. Her post is this week’s contemplation of LP, because it’s an awesome post, and because we are heading into a period of intense animal presence in and around the park.

How rare it is for us humans to be encountered in the wild by an animal who seems without fear of us, and even more powerfully, to whom we are of calm interest. To see ourselves in their eyes, to be recognized in some way as having a presence, perhaps even being of a kindred nature, perhaps, ultimately, with personhood — such an experience reminds us who we are….Some deep part of us yearns for this recognition.

RCK

Personally, I wait each year for the ruby crowned kinglets–skittish little lovelies with beautiful songs.  Yesterday I noted on WSB Facebook that a neighbor had seen a coyote on the perimeter of the park three days in a row, a seasonal presence to watch for. There are owls, bald eagles, wrens, tree creepers like nuthatches and browns, song sparrows and squirrels, of course. We can watch them, and there’s a sense that they might enjoy watching us.

May you be in the presence of the animals that make their home in LP; coexisting with them is deeply, deeply soothing to the soul.  Thanks Trileigh!

Video

52WoLP, week 7: A most beautiful thing

This week in 52 Weeks of Lincoln Park, we meet Sky Darwin, a local artist you might see if you’re very lucky along the shores of the Salish Sea in Lincoln Park. He does beautiful things with driftwood. Beautiful. His sculptural works made me think of mandalas, because surely the delicately balanced pieces he was fine tuning would be washed away with the next high tide. And that, of course, only added to the pleasure of his creations. Take a gander:

Sky studied at Cornish and has been working on these all-too-brief sculptural installations since Sept. 2012. He has a background in dance, music and design–all in evidence here. He took videos of the finished product but as yet they’re not up on vimeo or youtube. On the other hand, they are up on his facebook page so maybe look him up–the vids are great because you can hear kids marveling at the pieces moving gently in the sunset breeze.

These pieces were beautiful. And as predicted, I cruised by the spot where they were a day or so later, and they were gone. Beauty is fleeting.

Thanks Sky!

Addendum 3/4/13: Sky now has an official Facebook page–https//:www.facebook.m/ShiftwoodSculpture check it out, he put more pictures and videos there, and will keep it fresh with new stuff for our pure, unadulterated enjoyment. Live aloha!

Running after 50: distance (part deux)

After running my farthest distance yet just the other day (6.25 miles), I’ve had plenty of opportunity to think about one’s own ideas about distance.

This last spring when I first started to increase my endurance and strength, I did so after my nephew suggested I start using the program described in Body for Life–one thing in particular: the running for 20 minutes routine, every third day.  What was revolutionary for me: alternating weight training and running made the days I ran even more important.  And shooting for a really good 20 minute run, with hills and flats, increased my own expectations of what I could do–I loved it.

Pretty soon, however, 20 mins wasn’t enough. Just about the time I pushed the time up to 25 minutes, I decided to try my first 5K.  The deal was, I switched from time to distance, but time running was always the necessary foundation and now, when I’ve pushed myself too hard and I feel on the edge of perhaps injuring myself, I switch back to time.

Distance feels better than time, for some reason.  Saying I ran 3.5 miles just seems like more of an accomplishment than saying I ran 32 minutes.

But knowing–and using the knowledge–that I can and should modulate between the two sometimes is a great thing to learn.  The other day, after running 6.25 miles, I was sore and tired.  The next day, my chronically sore heels were whimpering for some TLC.  Even though I was sort of excited by the thought of another big run, it was time to ease back–way back.  And build up again.  I ran for 25 minutes, an easy jog thru the park, and felt great–light on my feet and happy.

It’s important to pay close attention to this body that ain’t no spring chick anymore.  Working with it will help it to go the distance.

Running after 50: for the newbies amongst us

I’ve spent the last few years on this blog focused on environmental changes I can make by myself (My Life with Car series) here in my own home and my own life.

Oddly, among the changes my own environmental experiments have wrought, I count my three year old passion/torture: running.

For one year, I tracked my driving habits in order to reduce needless driving, use my bike more, use mass transit, combine tasks, what have you.  While lots and lots of changes–big and small–came out of that year, one change was completely unexpected: my addiction to running.

I’ve never been a runner–not ever.  And some would say, with my paltry collection of 5K bib numbers, I’m still not a runner (my neighbor has indicated that a 5K is not a race, as she can do it in her sleep.  Oh well.).  I recall back in high school going through the motions required for 100 yard dash tests and such, and not enjoying one second of it.

But that’s not to say I’m not athletic at all–I’ve been an avid bike rider for a long time, commuting to work, touring, stuff like that. And then there’s hiking, river rafting…I’m not a total couch potato, but running just has never, ever been on the agenda.

So how did this start?  I used to belong to a gym, and used to drive to the gym.  I really enjoyed the gym but over-use taught me the value of using different muscle sets.  One day I tried the treadmill and was astonished to find I liked the sensation of running–slowly, for sure, but still.

I kept at it and a 10-15 min run on the treadmill was soon part of my normal workout.  About this time, I realized there was something uncomfortably ironic about driving my car to workout at a gym when I live a block from a gorgeous park on the Puget Sound with great running trails.  One day I tried running down along the beach front–hello.  Running on ground is REALLY different from running on a treadmill.  But I liked it! I felt great afterwards.

And I was totally pleased with myself that even though I was over 50, I was sort of kind of picking up this new sport that seemed to be the realm of the long and lean (definitely not me.) This was three years ago.

running in the rain

running in the rain

After about a year of splitting between outdoor runs and the gym, my attendance at the gym had really started to decline. I made the decision earlier this year to cancel my gym membership and focus solely on running outdoors.  This was huge–especially since I view the Seattle outdoors during 6 months of the year to be uninhabitable.  But I did it.

This past weekend I decided that this journey which has honest-to-god changed my life was worth sharing with others who are over 50 and learning to run, or thinking about it, or curious or whatever.  So begins a new chapter in this blog: Learning to run after 50.

Day 127 thru 131: MLwC –somethin’s goin on

Ever find yourself in the middle of a project, right in the middle where the end seems far away and you can’t remember how it all started and suddenly you just feel like f*ckit, who cares? I’m sort of, but not entirely, in that place with MLwC…and I don’t know why. I mean, I like all the new habits I’m carving out for myself. I’m perfectly happy–no, I’m happier!–taking the bus downtown and am going downtown more often and enjoy it more. So, what’s up?

I think it might be all the summer tasks to tend to, the garden stuff, the out of town visitors, the trips, the fun-in-the-sun…all combined with a lot of work travel lately and I guess I’m feeling like the whole MLwC thing is too much to think about. Or maybe I feel guilty for driving when I do–which still isn’t very often so I don’t know why it’s such a big deal in my mind.

But somehow, it is. Somehow I’ve become a little fascist in my own mind. A fundie about driving. How the heck did that happen?

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To be continued…..

Daily Stats (Thu, Fri, Sat, Sun)
Car: 0
Bike: 14.4 miles
Ped: approx 10 miles
Bus: approx 10 miles
water taxi: 2 miles

Day 123 thru 125: MLwC, fast breeds faster

I’ve been using my car more than usual the past week and I think I know why.  But first, it’s just interesting how a change in your normal day will cause changes down the line and unless you’re paying attention, that change can become habit.  I noticed this a lot when I worked in a regular office–the things that I used to do regularly, commute on my bike, get outside, grow my own vegetables in the summer–all sort of fell by the wayside after a while.  And I didn’t notice until other habits had overwhelmed the things I loved doing that things had changed.

It’s sort of like invasive species, how they take over.  Nowadays, I work with different companies and lots of different people and I notice that there are people who make sure they hold on to things that are important to them…and they’re usually kind of quiet about it.  Like they’re flying under the radar in a way.  I admire them and wish I’d had that kind of awareness back a few years ago.

So, returning to why I’ve been driving more the last couple of weeks.

The current project I’m working on sort of came up unexpectedly, as is often the case, throwing my whole schedule into disarray. As a result of being gone and spending a total of one work-day in the air going to and returning from Chicago (not to mention sitting in airports waiting for delayed flights), I come up short at the end of the week in the time-available-to-d0-everything-else department. Downstream from that situation, I have found myself resorting to using my car to get everything done that I need to get done…simply because I don’t have enough time.

Diana commented the other day that it’s tough for a working Mom to get all the things done in a day with a kid and full time job and etc, etc. On top of that, where she lives in Idaho, public transit just isn’t an option. It’s virtually non-existent.

We pack a lot into our days and our transportation of choice–cars–allows us to pack even more. For lots of people, doing less is unthinkable, and for me in the past few days, just getting the required tasks done without a car has been unthinkable. I’m looking forward to not using my car for the rest of this coming week, since on top of trying to get a lot of tasks done, I’m really sick of traffic and irritated by the cumbersome nature of driving, parking, etc etc.
Daily stats (Fri, Sat, Sun)

Car: 21 miles (6 tasks, 2 people)
Bike:
Ped:
Bus:
Air:

Day 96: MLwC and the walking thang

(MLwC = My Life w Car, a year long project to become generally conscious of transportation habits.)

B2 had so many good points in his comment to Day 95, I hardly know where to begin. He’s right, of course–most urban and certainly suburban areas in the U.S. are built for cars. Especially here in the western U.S. It’s a sad truth, and changing that feature will be an uphill battle.

Germany gets high marks for its progressive and strong Green Party so it’s not surprising they encourage mass transit, bikes, and walking to the degree they do. But many of the cities are also very old–like really old–and those wonderful cobbled streets simply aren’t made for cars. They’d have to retool the whole city for cars…kinda like what they’d have to do for most US cities in order to make them more pedestrian/bike friendly.

When the mayor of Seattle recently announced his plan to make bikes an attractive alternative transportation option, I recall someone wrote into the local newspaper decrying the idea since, good lord, people on bikes don’t buy anything! Why would our tax dollars go to a group that can’t buy anything? It was a depressing and eye-opening response…not to mention ridiculous. Our entire culture is literally built on going and buying. Everything in our infrastructure makes those two things easy…and other things less so.

My friend Brian said: imagine closing one entire street the length of Seattle and opening it up to pedestrians and cyclists. Imagine the traffic you’d get. And imagine the cafes, the stores, the theatres that could spring up along that route.

Well, I’d love to see it–I could see it in my mind instantly. But we’d have to retool everything.

And speaking of retooling–another conversation later with Yo raised the question of “why do we just automatically think we need to drive?” I’m thinking it’s because we’ve been raised with movies and adverts and pictures of people having the time of their lives, roaring down the coast highway, zipping around gorgeous empty curves overlooking the pacific ocean…and by now we’re hardwired to believe that image over our own experience–of bottle-necked freeways, smog, the price of gas, congestion, noise, maintenance, etc.

quantum-leap-car-730928.jpg Now here’s the real question: isn’t it a coincidence that what we call “cool” just happens to be something that can be commoditized and packaged easily (a car and a lifestyle) while something as normal as apple pie is simply not cool at all, not commoditized, not packaged, not marketable? I’m talking about walking, of course.

Daily stats (Tuesday)
Car: 0
Bike: 10 miles
Bus: approx 1.5 miles
West Seattle Water Taxi: approx 1.5 miles
Foot: approx 6 blocks

Walking, and how to think about “transportation”

Tom followed up yesterday’s piece on walking with a great entry of his own–with gorgeous snaps of his daily route through Lisbon–including time, transportation mode (mostly walking) and some thoughts about the added benefits of not driving. It reads at time like a poem, at other times like a mini-travelogue.

Jodene followed up this morning with a comment on her own walking method and a tangential thought about the long term (very nice nod to investment strategies!) benefits of walking–intellectual, physical, emotional, environmental.

So, I got to thinking: how cool would it be to get feedback from anyone/everyone who actually shakes it up in the transportation department. Those who are doing something other than the regular single-car/single-passenger-moving-through-urban space routine–and what you think about it. What does your transportation method allow you that you would not get from driving?

This would be more than a survey with radio buttons. This would be postcards from the urban-travel edge. We’ll see, maybe it could work.

Day 94: MLWC and Go, Al, Go!

Al Gore is a founding partner, with David Blood, in an investment firm that focuses on environmentally progressive enterprises. They toyed with the name of the firm, ala Blood & Gore but demurred. Anyhoo, officially and preferably known as Generation Investment Management, the two founders explain their approach here.

What really struck me about their management style:

  • they must have used the words long term about 50 times in the article–I love that. Most companies are only looking at the quarter, under pressure from the market, and I truly think this is doing us all a great disservice. Just look what short term quarterly report shenanigans have gotten us into–Enron, Worldcom, etc.
  • short term investing gives up the value of building a strong biz foundation.
  • they research specifically how a company is responding to our current and growing limited ecological systems; they’re focused on long term issues like building an infrastructure that will significantly reduce carbon budget and reduce waste (less waste=more $).
  • Did I mention long term?

They also smartly distinguish between “socially conscious investment” which can and does often include companies like McDonald’s and Wal-Mart because these, and other companies, have learned how to beat the “check-list” approach to hiring, benefit packages, etc. I find I have to look very closely at the portfolios of lots of “socially conscious” investment funds to make sure I’m not investing in a company I literally want nothing to do with.

Al Gore has also released his new book, Assault on Reason (see my “pile ‘o’ books by the bed, right nav); his timing is impeccable–he can leave the door open for a fervent recruitment to run for prez again and he doesn’t sound like sour grapes. If he’d written a book like this two years after the election he won/lost, he would have had no credibility. A real testament–whether you like the guy or not–to waiting for the right moment to act.

Daily Stats: Sunday
Car: 6.5 miles (2 people, 3 tasks)
Bike: 0
Foot: here and there
Bus: 0

Day 92 & 93: MLWC, some green links and Measuring KM

A bunch of green specific websites are springing up. They sort of remind me of the early days in the gay&lesbian community when everything had to be really gay&lesbian and only gay&lesbian or it didn’t count. Things are much more mainstreamed now and that’s a good thing in many ways–hopefully the path to mainstreaming green living, green concerns, green investing will be faster, smoother, better.

So, without further ado:
Greener.com, a green search engine. If you want to find something, but want to narrow the field to green, here’s your engine.
Greenmaven, another search engine that also includes social awareness along with greeniness in its search results.
Hugg is like Digg but with a green angle. This one’s pretty interesting and since I have found myself having a hard time categorizing green stories adequately in Digg, I’m liking the alternative.
Inhabitat is a beautiful blog discussing sustainable design of all kinds. It’s gorgeous in a West Coast Zen kind of way.

And now for something completely different: measuring the effectiveness of KM. Suarez in his blog discusses the ongoing question of measuring KM–to prove its worth to everyone from end users to IT, to Veeps, etc. He despairs of finding an adequate answer to the ongoing question and I don’t blame him. KM usage, wikis, blogs, etc are all experiential and viral in their best cases; like I ranted in my post yesterday, KM of all stripes is a haven for command-and-control management and the insistence on measurement is a key indicator of command-and-control style.

That said, I don’t live in such a fantasy land that I think we’ll get rid of measurement any time soon. I introduced wikis to a very large, global computer maker and the biggest difficulty we had in the process was trying to get them to think differently about “measurement.” I don’t think we succeeded, and as a result, even though the wiki is successful in terms of adoption, the lack of meaningful (read: corporate) measurement has all but made the wiki invisible to upper echalons of management. They can’t talk about it in numbers, so they disregard it. Fortunately, the wiki itself, intended for front line users, can live quite happily without a lot of attention.

My ongoing philosophical question: has Excel made life better or worse or something in between? We now use it because we can–for anything and everything. It’s a fabulous tool…I just wish sometimes we could put it down and thinking differently about things.

Daily stats:
Car: 0
Bike: 10.2 miles
Foot: 0
Bus:0

Day 92 & 93: MLWC plus Command-and-Control Knowledge

Alright, it’s about time “My Life w Car” got its own acronym, doncha think? So, here we go: MLWC. For a while, I’ll link back to day 90 for an explanation of the project and then, once it’s so common place that I hear it on the nightly news, I’ll stop linking 😉

Command and Control Knowledge “Management.”
I consult on operational issues relating to the customer and the front-line worker—that vital connection between the company and the public. Of late, that connection has shown some wear and tear. Its been commoditized as companies try to manage costs—and when they try to manage costs, they head for the frontline first. They buy software, dream of robotic systems, outsource their service—not because it’s better but because they hope it will make the problem of the frontline-to-customer relationship go away.

Knowledge Management, in all its many forms, is a command-and-control oasis. With very few exceptions (and those exceptions are basically Web 2.0 leaders), companies desperately hang onto the notion that they should, and can, control the information that flows from the agent to the customer. This subverts the agent’s role into that of a robot and so far in all my agent observations, I’ve yet to meet a robot.

Internet-based knowledge sharing—wikis, blogs, online collaboration tools—is both revolutionary and elegant. It engages people at an intuitive level and collects tacit knowledge in natural, accessible ways. Legal will hate it, IT will distrust it, Management will eschew it because they don’t understand it. The New Knowledge Sharing–how many more Knowledge acronyms can we bear??–which will take place online is the one innovation that will engage the front-line, enable JIT knowledge transfer, help the customer, and give command-and-control management style a run for its money. I know where I’m placing my bets.

A couple of articles to consider about this issue:

    A local fave rave consulting group, Ramp Group, has some interesting thoughts about knowledge and content sharing on their blog.

    Here’s a great rundown of articles tackling the problem of knowledge sharing across global groups and in enterprises–note the dates of the articles, the more recent ones are coming to the same conclusions as above.

Daily Stats:
Car: 13 miles (1 person/3 tasks)
Bike: 0
Bus: 0

Note: Jorge Gajardos Rojas from Chile wrote yesterday to ask why I don’t just walk? He lives close to work and ammenities and walks daily. Such a great question–most Americans don’t walk unless it’s for leisure. We don’t walk to the grocery store, for sure. We couldn’t carry back the massive amount of stuff we buy. But elsewhere in the world people walk everywhere, daily. I’ve walked to the grocery store a few times in this project but haven’t kept track of it; I imagine if I walked to the store daily, I wouldn’t have to pay for a gym membership. Thanks Jorge!

Day 90: My Life w Car…the 90 Day Round-up!

The truly big news today is that this is Day 90 of my ongoing project to see if I can wean myself from a car in the space of a year. Mostly, I’ve been interested in just becoming more conscious of

  • How I use transportation
  • How I use my car specifically

So, here’s the lowdown: when I first started this, I thought of using my car every single day. There wasn’t a day that I didn’t have to struggle at least a little to think around the use of the car.

I can very happily say that somewhere along the line, not sure where, that all changed. Now it feels like a drag to use my car. Gas, parking, traffic–you name it, it’s just not pleasant.

traffic jam

Next big news: I paid some bucks to have my bike fit me and tuned properly and it made all the difference in the world. I don’t think twice about using my bike now, and I’m more fit, happier and more connected to my sweet West Seattle. I look forward to running an errand most days–it’s a great break from my work, and a chance to get ouside.

bianchi bike

Next really big news: The Bus. The first day I took the bus, I hated it. It was around Day 60 and I only did it because it was part of this experiment and I needed to learn about it. Well, guess what. Now I love it–I bought a pass to make the whole change thing easier, it takes me right downtown in 15 minutes and I get to catch up on reading or ipodding or whatever. And once downtown, I get a nice walk to whatever meeting I’ve got set up. Sweet deal–return trip within a couple of hours and the whole thing costs $1.25. Look, I’m not poor, that’s not the issue. But suddenly I begin to see that the money I’m spending on gas, parking, insurance, upkeep, etc could be going to something I enjoy a whole lot more…with very little trouble. Just a matter of changing habits. Which they say takes about 90 days.
seattle071.jpg

90 Day Round-up!!!

Overall stats:
Car: 535 miles, approx 85% multi-task, multi-occupant
Bike: 176.30 miles, increasing daily mileage from Day 1 to Day 90 (by a lot!)
Hybrid-electro Bus: 60 miles (didn’t utilize the bus until around day 60)
Flexcar: 9 miles (didn’t hold quite the attraction I thought it would…)
Plane: 6,018 (that’s where my carbon footprint turns into carbon karma that I try to work off)

Day 90 stats (that’s today):
Car: zip
Bike: 5 miles
Bus: zip
planes, trains, flexcars: zip