Monthly Archives: January 2013

52 weeks of Lincoln Park: the art of nature

Week #4 finds us careening towards February, which means Valentine’s day which means love. Denise Dahn, another West Seattle artist and Lover of Lincoln Park, sent me a couple of photos of a few of her favorite things in Lincoln Park: The Dancing Otter and The Cedar & Doug entwined trees.

The otter is down along the water, north of the pool, and Cedar & Doug can be found on the trail that heads east from the fence trail, between the main Colman Pool trail down, and the Beach Trail a little further South. Well, might’s well just take all the trails, you’ll love it.

Cedar & Doug have grown together and are completely entwined at this point, roots, trunk and all.  They make a stunningly beautiful couple.

I added of my faves, too–what Denise calls the Pock Marked tree ( a tree which has become a virtual cafeteria for flickers and woodpeckers, and they are so systematic, it’s awesome) and finally, a semi permanent text based outdoor installation of found objects 😉
If you have any faves, let me know or share them here. Coming up soon: the birds of spring.

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52 Weeks of Lincoln Park (#3): Mystery Solved

Ok, so this is an obscure mystery, but still….When I was looking through the Seattle gov photo archives for stuff on Lincoln Park, I kept coming across a pix of a lily pond that was supposedly located in LP.  Except it had houses right behind it and it didn’t look like any part of LP I’d seen. Add to that the fact that Broadway Park on Cap Hill was called Lincoln Park before being renamed in 1922 and I figured: those lily pond pictures are from the other park, case closed.

the houses in the back, the clear space? mystery pond! (1936)

the houses in the back, the clear space? mystery pond! (1936)

But recently, friend, fellow artist, and West Seattle native Kirsten Wilhelm happened to mention the old lily pond in Lincoln Park–how she used to love it as a kid.  What?!  Where is this thing!  Well, it’s at the northern edge of the park, right where there’s this odd clump of bamboo…look behind the bamboo, in the bramble and you’ll see the remains of the lily pad pond.  The boulders and landscaping are still visible, but it’s very much overgrown from its earlier incarnation…which is ok, imo, since a lily pond in the piney-cedary woods of our beloved LP is kind of a stretch.  But a lovely idea anyway.  Please let me know if you have faves or special tidbits about LP you’d like to share–cuz we all wanna know!

52 Weeks of Lincoln Park: everybody knows

Well, not everybody.  The kids in the neighborhood know, and I’m guessing other kids know too–about the butt rock and boob tree, important LP landmarks. We’re at week #3 in 52WoLP and going straight from the sublime to the silly….but to be honest, the butt rock and the boob tree are awesome landmarks, imho.

So without further ado:

A friend of mine discovered one day that a part of one of the madronas looks just like a woman with long hair.  I haven’t found it yet, but I’m sure there are others.  If you have photos of faves, please send and I’ll post.  Yay LP!

52 Weeks of Lincoln Park: good bones

The Collins Precise English Dictionary defines “good bones” as “having admirable, pleasing, superior, or positive qualities.” When I think of Lincoln Park, I think of the beautiful path that hugs the Salish Sea, of the nearly always blustery point, of the cliffs and hillsides with their winding trails and proud madronas, oaks and pines.

WPA stamp 1936, Lincoln Park path

WPA stamp 1936, Lincoln Park path

Many of the features we’d call “good bones” today were actually put in place in the 1930s, first by the Civil Works Administration and later by the Public Works Administration (depression era endeavors, “Roosevelt was convinced that jobs were much better for everyone than cash handouts”), small armies of unemployed men given projects that were so smart, so right, that we still enjoy them today.  And others were a good start, that met with challenges.  The seawalls–which are currently getting hit by ever rising tides during our annual King Tide fest–were finished in 1936. For the most part, they still hold the shore.  You can see in one shot that the new wall and adjacent road quickly met their match with the tides and winter storms.  No matter, the collapse was filled in with gravel and has since been a great little running path along the water. Enjoy!

Week #2 of 52WoLP.

52 Weeks of Lincoln Park: Driftwood

A few years back I did a year-long, nearly daily project called My Life w/Car, or MLwC, wherein I tracked my transportation to see if maybe I could change some unconscious habits.  Basically I wanted to get rid of my car.  I ended up not doing that, but for sure changed everything around my transportation habits.  It was a very good project.

I’m starting a new blog project today called 52 Weeks of Lincoln Park, or 52WoLP.  The goals are not as ambitious, I suppose…well, there are no goals, so there. What I want to do is simply pay homage to a gorgeous gem of a park, Lincoln Park, here in West Seattle.

LP is spectacular in so many ways. It is both urban forest and recreation area: a stand of sequoia watches over a baseball field, with native undergrowth all around, and a real sense of “getting away” from things for a while, even as you hear the crack of a bat and cheers from spectators.

It is refuge for nesting bald eagles, owls, warblers, and baby seals, as well as  families with their kids splashing in the wading pool or playing on the swings.

It has a zip line that I swear is going at all times of the day and night–it’s short, it’s free, and it’s very very popular.  It’s exceptionally low tech, especially the old tire at the end of the line.

In the summer it has Shakespearean theatre as the sun sets fabulously golden and lovely over Vashon Island.  It has seen its own share of theatre recently as friends of Lincoln Park stood together against what would have been a massive, very invasive change to its nature.

So each week this year, I’m going to simply witness a wonderful thing about Lincoln Park, to pay my respects and share this gem we have here in Seattle. First up, because the sunset walks along the water the past few days have been spectacular: Driftwood.